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Teaching

Please find below descriptions and syllabi of selected recent courses that Dr. Lustig have taught at Tulane University and the Elliot School of International Affairs at George Washington University.  

TULANE UNIVERSITY:

Distribution and Redistribution of Income Independent Study: Fall 2014; Spring 2015
This course covers the quantitative analysis of inequality and poverty measures; theories of income

distribution; decomposition methods; and, the theory and practice of fiscal incidence analysis. Students will learn theories and methods, and apply them to a particular country.

Click here to download syllabus from 2015.

Click here to download syllabus from 2014.

 

Economics of Poverty: Fall 2012; Fall 2013; Spring 2015Economics of Poverty, Fall 2013
This course presents an overview of poverty analysis and how it is applied by multilateral organizations. Topics include measuring poverty, analyzing the characteristics of the poor, and assessing policies to reduce poverty. Using the World Bank’s poverty assessments as a model, students will learn to prepare a basic poverty assessment for a developing country.  Students will also learn basic poverty analysis techniques using the statistical software package Stata.

Click here to download syllabus from 2015.

Click here to download syllabus from 2012. 

Inequality and Poverty in Latin America: Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012; Spring 2013; Fall 2013; Spring 2014, Fall 2014
Latin America is the region with the highest levels of income inequality and where inequality has been most persistent. Through comparative and in-depth country studies this course analyzes the dynamics of income inequality and poverty in the region focusing on the role of markets and the state. The course includes a review of quantitative methods to measure inequality and poverty and the theories and methods to analyze their determinants. Using a qualitative scorecard, students will learn to assess government efforts to reduce inequality and poverty. The course is largely non-technical and open to graduate and undergraduate students in the social sciences. The purpose of this course is to develop a broad understanding of the dynamics of inequality and poverty in Latin America and how market forces and government policies affect those dynamics. By the end of the course, students should have learned: 1. existing methods to measure inequality and poverty, their properties and limitations; 2. the facts on inequality and poverty in Latin America and where to find them; 3. existing theories and methods to analyze the causes and consequences of inequality and poverty and apply them to the countries covered in the course; and, 4. to apply a qualitative scorecard to assess Latin American governments’ commitment to reduce inequality and poverty.

Inequality and Poverty Syllabus from 2014.

Inequality and Poverty Syllabus from 2012. 

Inequality and Poverty Syllabus from 2011.  

Topics in Economic Development: Fall 2010, Fall 2011
This course will analyze the economic challenges faced by low and middle-income countries in their quest for development. The course will be divided into two sections. In the first section, we will address the challenge of economic growth and what might cause some development strategies to succeed and others to fail. In particular, we will focus on the role played by government policies and economic openness in fostering growth. In the second part of the course, we will address the challenges of generating equitable growth. We will examine the trends in poverty and inequality in specific regions and countries, learn about the interconnections between inequality and growth, and analyze how development strategies and government policies may result in more, or less, equitable outcomes. In this course, students will have an opportunity to apply the tools of economic analysis to both broad and specific policy issues, gain an in-depth understanding of the evolution of development thinking, and be able to analyze the experience of specific countries to gain insights on which factors account for their economic success or lack of it.

          Topics in Economic Development Syllabus from Fall 2011

Capstone: Economics of Poverty Analysis: Spring 2010, Spring 2012, Fall 2014
This course presents an overview of poverty analysis and how it is applied by multilateral organizations. Topics include measuring poverty, analyzing its economic determinants, and assessing policies to reduce poverty. Using the World Bank’s poverty assessments as a model, students learn to prepare a basic poverty assessment for a developing country of their own choosing.

Economics of Poverty Analysis syllabus from 2014.

Economics of Poverty Analysis syllabus from 2010.

Economic Development Policy: Spring 2008, Fall 2009
This course analyzes the economic challenges faced by low and middle-income countries in their quest for development. The course is divided into two sections. In the first section, the challenge of economic growth and what might cause some development strategies to succeed and others to fail is discussed. In particular, we focus on the role played by government policies and economic openness in fostering growth. In the second part of the course, we address the challenges of generating equitable growth. We examine the trends in poverty and inequality in specific regions and countries, learn about the interconnections between inequality and growth, and analyze how development strategies and government policies may result in more, or less, equitable outcomes. In this course, students have an opportunity to apply the tools of economic analysis to both broad and specific policy issues, gain an in-depth understanding of the evolution of development thinking, and be able to analyze the experience of specific countries to gain insights on which factors account for their economic success or lack of it.

Economic Development Policy syllabus Fall 2009.

Inequality and Poverty in the Global Economy Lecture Series: Spring 2008, Spring 2009
Since mid-2007, the world has faced not only rising food and fuel prices but also a financial crisis of global proportions that will affect millions of people in all regions. The Inequality and Poverty in the Global Economy course focuses on the likely impact of these adverse shocks on poverty, inequality and human development and what policies would be most successful in protecting the poor and vulnerable.

Inequality and Poverty in the Global Economy Lecture Series syllabus Spring 2009. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY:

Economic Development Policy: Spring 2008,  Fall 2009
This course analyzes the economic challenges faced by low and middle-income countries in their quest for development. The course is divided into two sections. In the first section, the challenge of economic growth and what might cause some development strategies to succeed and others to fail is discussed. In particular, we focus on the role played by government policies and economic openness in fostering growth. In the second part of the course, we address the challenges of generating equitable growth. We examine the trends in poverty and inequality in specific regions and countries, learn about the interconnections between inequality and growth, and analyze how development strategies and government policies may result in more, or less, equitable outcomes. In this course, students have an opportunity to apply the tools of economic analysis to both broad and specific policy issues, gain an in-depth understanding of the evolution of development thinking, and be able to analyze the experience of specific countries to gain insights on which factors account for their economic success or lack of it.

       Economic Development Policy syllabus from Fall 2009.

Inequality and Poverty in the Global Economy Lecture Series: Spring 2008, Spring 2009
Since mid-2007, the world has faced not only rising food and fuel prices but also a financial crisis of global proportions that will affect millions of people in all regions. The Inequality and Poverty in the Global Economy course focuses on the likely impact of these adverse shocks on poverty, inequality and human development and what policies would be most successful in protecting the poor and vulnerable.

       Inequality and Poverty in the Global Economy Lecture Series syllabus Spring 2009. 

Economic Development: Fall 2007, Fall 2008
This Master’s level course analyzes the economic challenges faced by low and middle-income countries in their quest for development. The course is divided into three sections. In the first section, the challenges of economic growth are addressed. Focusing on specific countries, it examines what causes some development strategies to succeed and others to fail. In particular it focuses on the role played by the government, economic openness and multilateral lending institutions and foreign aid in fostering development. In the second part of the course, the challenges of generating equitable growth are addressed. After examining the trends in poverty and inequality in specific regions and countries, it analyzes which development strategies and government policies result in more equitable outcomes. In the final portion of the course, the focus is on the causes and consequences of one of today’s key development challenges: rising food prices.

Economic Development syllabus Fall 2008. 

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